Weight Management

Trying to build muscle? Don’t cut the carbs

Author: 
Leslie Beck
01/21/2014

I strength-train four days a week and eat a high-protein diet, but I’m not gaining muscle. What I am doing wrong with my diet?  Read more

Mediterranean Diet May Be Good for the Brain

Author: 
Robert Preidt
09/05/2013

Eating a Mediterranean diet may be good for your brain and might reduce the risk of dementia, a new review suggests.Read more

Does eating wheat really pack on the pounds?

08/02/2013

Does eating wheat pack on the pounds?  For losing weight and keeping it off, there's nothing magical about going wheat-free. Read article

Re-used with permission of Nutrition Action Healthletter, NutritionAction.com

Wheat Belly

 

Does eating wheat pack on the pounds?  For losing weight and keeping it off, there's nothing magical about going wheat-free. 
Nutrition Action Healthletter, NutritionAction.com
Fact Sheets

Fiber-rich grains tied to lower diabetes risk

Author: 
Genevra Pittman, Medline Plus
07/02/2013

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who eat a diet high in fiber-rich whole grains are less likely to develop diabetes or heart disease, according to a review of past studies.

The analysis was conducted for the American Society for Nutrition. In a position statement, the group said evidence suggests foods with cereal fiber or mixtures of whole grains and bran are "modestly associated" with a reduced disease risk.

To read the complete article, click here.

 

WFC Points Out Inaccuracies in National Geographic Article

04/09/2013

The Wheat Foods Council (WFC) is taking National Geographic to task for numerous inaccuracies about wheat, wheat breeding and celiac disease in an article entitled “Gut Reactions” appearing in the April 2013 issue. In a letter to editor Chris Johns on behalf of the WFC, Dr. Brett Carver, Wheat Genetics Chair at Oklahoma State University and chair of the US National Wheat Improvement Committee, characterized the article as “a very one-sided, inadequate coverage of an extremely complicated issue.”
Read more

Optimal Macronutrient Content of the Diet for Adolescents With Prediabetes; RESIST a Randomised Control Trial

Author: 
Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, Sarah P. Garnett, Megan Gow, Mandy Ho, Louise A. Baur, Manny Noakes, Helen J. Woodhead, Carolyn R. Broderick, Susie Burrell, Kerryn Chisholm, Jocelyn Halim, Sukanya De, Katherine Steinbeck, Shubha Srinivasan, Geoffrey R. Ambler, Michael R. Kohn and Chris T. Cowell
03/26/2013

Context: Prediabetes and clinical insulin resistance in adolescents are rapidly emerging clinical problems with serious health outcomes.

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of 2 structured lifestyle interventions, both differing in diet macronutrient composition, on insulin sensitivity.

Design: This study was a randomized controlled trial, known as Researching Effective Strategies to Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Children and Teenagers, in 2 hospitals in Sydney, Australia.Read more

Onions – the Unsung Hero of Healthy Eating

04/06/2013

“The onion and its satin wrappings is among the most beautiful of vegetables and is the only one that represents the essence of things. It can be said to have a soul.” -- Charles Dudley Warner, ‘My Summer in a Garden’ (1871)

Onions may or may not have a soul, but they do provide substantial health benefits. Part of the Allium family of vegetables, onions, along with garlic, leeks, shallots, scallions and chives, have shown they help reduce cancer risks, contribute to heart health, aid digestion, protect brain tissue, and strengthen bones.Read more

Kids who eat cereal for breakfast have lower BMI

Author: 
Jason Owen
02/08/2013

We’ve all heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Now, a recently released study offers yet another reason: Children who start their day with a cereal breakfast—even if that cereal is presweetened—tend to have lower body mass indexes (BMIs) and less chance of being overweight or obese than children who eat other breakfasts or who skip the meal entirely.

The study was published in peer-reviewed healthcare journal Infant, Child & Adolescent Nutrition (ICAN).Read more

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